Initiative will benefit five districts in different ecoregions
Scaling up the ‘Community Land Value Chain’ (CaVaTeCo) approach in Mozambique
Initiative will benefit five districts in different ecoregions
Scaling up the ‘Community Land Value Chain’ (CaVaTeCo) approach in Mozambique

Mozambique is equipped with one of the best policies and legal frameworks for land tenure on the African continent. The Constitution, land law and regulations contain a crucial combination of clauses that provide an important opportunity for local communities to undertake the self-documentation of their land rights. Essentially these clauses state that the land rights exist by operation of law, that they are not prejudiced by their lack of formal registration or titling, and that they may be proved by the members of a local community.

Approximately 18 million Mozambicans live in rural areas, depending principally on the land and natural resources around them to sustain their livelihoods; 80 percent of the total population is involved in agricultural activities, which contributes to 40 percent of the gross national product (GNP).  

Despite their rights to use their land being embedded in the law, most rural farmers are unable to obtain documentation that proves the existence and extent of these rights. Without such documentation, these land rights remain vulnerable to be re-allocated by government to other actors. 

Mozambique’s current approach to the documentation of land rights is a formalistic and centrally-driven process that envisages the issuance of formal state titles by the cadastral authorities. The national “Terra Segura” programme, launched by the Ministry of Land, Environment and Rural Development, aims at documenting and mapping the rights over some 5 million land holdings, but progress has been slow and costly, and a lack of “consistency and harmonisation” has been documented. 

There is therefore a significant opportunity for this project to demonstrate a process that could provide tenure security to millions of rural Mozambicans. The provision of an independent platform of integrated tools and technologies would allow them, in a low resource context, to register and document their own land holdings as part of a process that is both legal and legitimate but unfettered by bureaucratic inertia or lack of political will.

With this platform, land rights holders will be able to approach their own local association to obtain a document proving their rights, and then leverage this document in various ways; for example, to defend those rights, to raise credit or receive agricultural inputs, or to underpin the establishment of formal contracts with third party suppliers or buyers.

For the full story of how land and forest rights have been implemented in Mozambique go to the timeline

Security of land tenure is recognised as an important factor for increasing agricultural production and reducing poverty. Uncertainty in respect to land tenure constrains individual land holders, and entire communities, from making investments in land, or in improvements to infrastructure that would help make their lives more sustainable and resilient in the face of droughts, floods or other climate-related risks.

“80% of the total population in Mozambique is involved in agricultural activities”

Goals

The principal objectives of the overall project are to map, verify and document the legally-recognised tenure rights of 60 communities and their members over the land and natural resources across the three target eco-regions, and to establish a sustainable independent national platform to host and administer the data related to those rights for their long-term maintenance and use.

“One of the project’s main contributions is the reduction of high levels of poverty of the Mozambican rural families who rely on land and natural resources as their main source of income by strengthening land rights security of local communities, strengthening capacity and transparent community land management, promoting equality of access, ownership and decision-making on land and natural resources between women and men, raising education, awareness and improving human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation and impact reduction.” — Calisto Ribeiro ORAM-NAMPULA

Objectives

  • To test the CaVaTeCo in different social and agro-ecological settings within the country, to further develop and adjust the tools ensuring that the methodologies and the tools of CaVaTeCo are sufficiently flexible to address the full range of cultural, economic, social and physical contexts that exist.
  • To consolidate the various data collection tools into a single and stable application and platform that can be easily deployed at scale via multiple different actors and stakeholders.
  • To develop a sustainable, nationally-available and independent ‘community cadastre’, designed to hold and administer the land rights data generated through the application of the CaVaTeCo.

Actions

  • Delimitation and formal certification of community land rights
  • Establishment and capacity-building of representative legal entities
  • Delimitation and local mapping & certification of household land rights
  • Participatory land use mapping
  • Development of national database & a platform of tools for tenure certification and records/data maintenance

Expected results 

  • 60 legally-established representative entities at community level (communal property associations) equipped with appropriate powers, tools and information for land and NR management.
  • 33,500 locally-issued Declarations certifying legal tenure rights over land parcels allocated to individuals and HHs, at least 40% of which held by women
  • A sustainable independent institution to manage a digital land rights register and cadastral system, making data available on community and family land rights through an accessible national platform.
  • A Learning & Outreach programme to facilitate uptake of CaVaTeCo approach/Cadastro Popular in additional locations and by other organisations.
“A fundamental prerequisite for achieving inclusive development for all is to promote equality of access, ownership and decision-making on land and natural resources between women and men.” — Calisto Ribeiro ORAM-NAMPULA

Expected impact 

  • Rural communities and their constituent families and households can independently register, formalise and maintain up-to-date information in respect to their land tenure rights.
  • NGOs will be provided with access to the People’s Cadastre platform and tools and receive training on the improved methodologies that have been developed as part of the CaVaTeCo.
  • Local public authorities will be able to participate in the project activities and be exposed to new and innovative tools and approaches to establishing tenure and efficient land administration systems, therefore improving the political context in Mozambique.
  • The successful deployment of the CaVaTeCo approach and the People’s Cadastre will provide a template that could be adopted nationally, and we have already had an impact on the on-going design of the Terra Segura programme. This will improve policy-making in Mozambique.


From July 1st 2019
To  December 31st 2021



US$2,216,304

Proponents

ORAM Nampula
 (Associação Rural de Ajuda Mutua-Nampula)

Partners

Terra Firma

Nitidae

LUPA (Associação para o Desenvolvimento Comunitário)

Beneficiaries

The project will benefit approximately 165,000 people across the three operational areas.

Mozambique is equipped with one of the best policies and legal frameworks for land tenure on the African continent. The Constitution, land law and regulations contain a crucial combination of clauses that provide an important opportunity for local communities to undertake the self-documentation of their land rights. Essentially these clauses state that the land rights exist by operation of law, that they are not prejudiced by their lack of formal registration or titling, and that they may be proved by the members of a local community.

Approximately 18 million Mozambicans live in rural areas, depending principally on the land and natural resources around them to sustain their livelihoods; 80 percent of the total population is involved in agricultural activities, which contributes to 40 percent of the gross national product (GNP).  

Despite their rights to use their land being embedded in the law, most rural farmers are unable to obtain documentation that proves the existence and extent of these rights. Without such documentation, these land rights remain vulnerable to be re-allocated by government to other actors. 

Mozambique’s current approach to the documentation of land rights is a formalistic and centrally-driven process that envisages the issuance of formal state titles by the cadastral authorities. The national “Terra Segura” programme, launched by the Ministry of Land, Environment and Rural Development, aims at documenting and mapping the rights over some 5 million land holdings, but progress has been slow and costly, and a lack of “consistency and harmonisation” has been documented. 

There is therefore a significant opportunity for this project to demonstrate a process that could provide tenure security to millions of rural Mozambicans. The provision of an independent platform of integrated tools and technologies would allow them, in a low resource context, to register and document their own land holdings as part of a process that is both legal and legitimate but unfettered by bureaucratic inertia or lack of political will.

With this platform, land rights holders will be able to approach their own local association to obtain a document proving their rights, and then leverage this document in various ways; for example, to defend those rights, to raise credit or receive agricultural inputs, or to underpin the establishment of formal contracts with third party suppliers or buyers.

For the full story of how land and forest rights have been implemented in Mozambique go to the timeline

Security of land tenure is recognised as an important factor for increasing agricultural production and reducing poverty. Uncertainty in respect to land tenure constrains individual land holders, and entire communities, from making investments in land, or in improvements to infrastructure that would help make their lives more sustainable and resilient in the face of droughts, floods or other climate-related risks.

“80% of the total population in Mozambique is involved in agricultural activities”

Goals

The principal objectives of the overall project are to map, verify and document the legally-recognised tenure rights of 60 communities and their members over the land and natural resources across the three target eco-regions, and to establish a sustainable independent national platform to host and administer the data related to those rights for their long-term maintenance and use.

“One of the project’s main contributions is the reduction of high levels of poverty of the Mozambican rural families who rely on land and natural resources as their main source of income by strengthening land rights security of local communities, strengthening capacity and transparent community land management, promoting equality of access, ownership and decision-making on land and natural resources between women and men, raising education, awareness and improving human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation and impact reduction.” — Calisto Ribeiro ORAM-NAMPULA

Objectives

  • To test the CaVaTeCo in different social and agro-ecological settings within the country, to further develop and adjust the tools ensuring that the methodologies and the tools of CaVaTeCo are sufficiently flexible to address the full range of cultural, economic, social and physical contexts that exist.
  • To consolidate the various data collection tools into a single and stable application and platform that can be easily deployed at scale via multiple different actors and stakeholders.
  • To develop a sustainable, nationally-available and independent ‘community cadastre’, designed to hold and administer the land rights data generated through the application of the CaVaTeCo.

Actions

  • Delimitation and formal certification of community land rights
  • Establishment and capacity-building of representative legal entities
  • Delimitation and local mapping & certification of household land rights
  • Participatory land use mapping
  • Development of national database & a platform of tools for tenure certification and records/data maintenance

Expected results 

  • 60 legally-established representative entities at community level (communal property associations) equipped with appropriate powers, tools and information for land and NR management.
  • 33,500 locally-issued Declarations certifying legal tenure rights over land parcels allocated to individuals and HHs, at least 40% of which held by women
  • A sustainable independent institution to manage a digital land rights register and cadastral system, making data available on community and family land rights through an accessible national platform.
  • A Learning & Outreach programme to facilitate uptake of CaVaTeCo approach/Cadastro Popular in additional locations and by other organisations.
“A fundamental prerequisite for achieving inclusive development for all is to promote equality of access, ownership and decision-making on land and natural resources between women and men.” — Calisto Ribeiro ORAM-NAMPULA

Expected impact 

  • Rural communities and their constituent families and households can independently register, formalise and maintain up-to-date information in respect to their land tenure rights.
  • NGOs will be provided with access to the People’s Cadastre platform and tools and receive training on the improved methodologies that have been developed as part of the CaVaTeCo.
  • Local public authorities will be able to participate in the project activities and be exposed to new and innovative tools and approaches to establishing tenure and efficient land administration systems, therefore improving the political context in Mozambique.
  • The successful deployment of the CaVaTeCo approach and the People’s Cadastre will provide a template that could be adopted nationally, and we have already had an impact on the on-going design of the Terra Segura programme. This will improve policy-making in Mozambique.


From 01 July 2019
To  31 December 2021


US$2,216,304

Proponents

ORAM Nampula
 (Associação Rural de Ajuda Mutua-Nampula)

Partners

Terra Firma

Nitidae

LUPA (Associação para o Desenvolvimento Comunitário)

Beneficiaries

The project will benefit approximately 165,000 people across the three operational areas.