Accelerating collective land titling in Panama
Project to strengthen the collective rights of land and territories of the Indigenous Peoples of Panama
Accelerating collective land titling in Panama
Project to strengthen the collective rights of land and territories of the Indigenous Peoples of Panama

The National Coordinating Body of Indigenous Peoples in Panama (COONAPIP) accelerated titling of indigenous lands, resolved tenure conflicts, and developed legal and administrative capacity to protect indigenous land rights. While Panama’s laws on indigenous rights are progressive, implementation lags far behind. With Tenure Facility support COONAPIP capitalized on the current government’s commitments to indigenous rights and favorable rulings of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the Panama Supreme Court.

The project trained 252 women,

men and young people in indigenous rights and law

Using GPS

communities mapped their territories

Indigenous Peoples from Tagarkunyala

mapped the boundaries of their land and forests

COONAPIP advanced titling of 223,500 hectares in four territories and resolved 18 tenure conflicts affecting communities

“COONAPIP was formed years ago to strengthen indigenous struggles, in particular that of the territories. It is essential that our brothers respect the land. It is our dream. Comarcas have been achieved, Law 72 has been achieved, but there has been no follow-up. Through the project with the Tenure Facility we can achieve a solid image and be heard. Due to lack of resources, it was possible to fall into fatigue beforehand, or end up going around and around as we pursue our just demands. But the project opened a path. A road was cut. It is possible now to sit down and talk to the government. There is also the important work of accompaniment of the Legal Clinic; and the technical strengthening of our youth. Measurements and land mapping, which previously could only be done by the government, when there was availability, now we can also do it very well, as our young people are trained. ” — Marcelo Guerra, President of COONAPIP

Goals

To consolidate and protect the collective rights (land, forest and water) of Panama’s Indigenous Peoples

Objectives

  • Capitalize on existing opportunities with the Government of Panama to accelerate processes of land titling, registry, and conflict resolution, and strengthen governance of indigenous territories
  • Develop institutional capacity to support the full exercise and protection of indigenous territorial rights
“The government was surprised because we, the seven indigenous groups, go together to the authorities to demand that dossiers be expedited at ANATI and MIAMBIENTE.” — Manuel Martinez, Project coordinator

Actions

  • Strengthen COONAPIP’s capacity to provide legal services in support of Indigenous Peoples’ full enjoyment, exercise, and protection of their rights to land, water, and forests
  • Train traditional indigenous authorities on priority issues of indigenous rights and develop permanent and continuous access to legal advice and services in support of the advancement of indigenous rights and territorial governance
  • Support titling and registration of the Collective Territories of Bajo Lepe and Pijibasal
  • Advance legal and administrative processes for the titling of the Territory of Maje Embera Drúa
  • Advance the titling processes in other communities.
“COONAPIP is the only entity that brings together Indigenous Peoples at the national level. Its seven different cultures are enriched by coexistence. COONAPIP is our “home” where we build collectively. Perseverance is important. Some have been waiting more than 20 years to gain their territory. We do not see the territories as a business, but rather as a necessity for the reproduction of our culture.” — Ariel Gonzalez, Project adjudicator

Results

  • Advanced titling of 223,500 hectares, including four territories and resolution of 18 tenure conflicts affecting communities
  • Supported titling and registration of the Collective Territories of Bajo Lepe and Pijibasal, however title not yet granted because Ministry of Environment has not approved due to overlap with land claimed by protected area
  • Advanced legal and administrative processes for the titling of the Territory of Maje Embera Drúa, however, title not yet granted because Ministry of Environment has not approved due to overlap with land claimed by protected area
  • Advanced the titling processes in other communities
  • Created ‘Clinica Juridica’ — a legal clinic that supports land titling
  • Clarified the steps for titling indigenous lands
  • Trained 252 women, men and young people in indigenous rights and law
  • Initiated discussions to establish a diploma at the University of Panama’s Faculty of Law to broaden understanding of Indigenous Peoples’ legal rights under national and international law
“We have been fighting the titling of our territory for more than 40 years. In the last year, with the support of COONAPIP’s PDCT project, we have advanced more than in the previous 40 years.” — Lazaro Mecha
, Regional chief, Majé Emberá Drüa collective territory

Impact

  • Strengthened COONAPIP’s administrative and technical skills and capacity title indigenous lands
  • Build momentum for faster and more efficient titling by raising awareness of Indigenous Peoples’ rights among government authorities, building relationships among relevant institutions and increasing the confidence of Indigenous Peoples in their power to effect change
  • Positioned Indigenous Peoples to protect land, forest and water, and improve livelihoods, thereby contributing to global climate change and development goals
  • Demonstrated new methods that indigenous communities can use to resolve conflicts among themselves and with government, investors, immigrants, and settlers

Completed


From 06/30/2015
To 30 April 2017

Budget
US$824,000

Proponents

COONAPIP (a federation of indigenous governments), and grant administration by registered NGO, Program for Social Promotion and Development (PRODESO)

Partners

Traditional authorities (congresses and councils) of participating indigenous territories

Associates

National Land Administration Authority (ANATI)

My Environment

National Commission for Political and Administrative Limits

National Geographic Institute “Tommy Guardia”

Rainforest Foundation US

Beneficiaries

Indigenous Peoples, communities and their participating traditional authorities

COONAPIP

National Land Administration Authority (ANATI)

National Environmental Authority (ANAM)

National Commission for Political and Administrative Limits

National Geographical Institute “Tommy Guardia”

Academic and civil society organizations

Lessons learned

  • Greater inclusion and equity for women and girls in the titling processes remains a challenge.
  • A detailed roadmap for titling is needed for all parties to understand the roles and responsibilities of each actor at every step.
  • Close working relationships between COONAPIP and government authorities is essential as evidenced by success of joint teams for preparing and verifying the titling application documents.
  • A strong Tenure Facility Country Focal Point for the entire project would have been valuable.
  • The windows of opportunity for the titling of indigenous territories can be very short, remaining open for only a few months and then closing abruptly due to government’s political considerations, without specific changes in a country’s relevant laws or the larger political and economic context.
  • A forward-looking legal framework, particularly in countries like Panama is not sufficient. The current framework can be complex, and the contradictions or inconsistencies within the various rules that regulate titling processes can be hard to understand, and these discrepancies can become “bottlenecks.”
  • A monitoring, assessment and learning system or approach must be tailored to a particular organization because organizations are different from each other. This suggests that, in the process creating the Tenure Facility monitoring, assessment and learning system, the “bottom-up” approach must be considered through paying more attention to local experience development, and seeing how these local experiences can feed into a system which applies to all Tenure Facility activities.

La Coordinadora Nacional de Pueblos Indígenas de Panamá (COONAPIP) aceleró la titulación de tierras indígenas, resolvió conflictos de tenencia y desarrolló capacidades legales y administrativas con miras a proteger los derechos territoriales. Si bien las leyes de Panamá en materia de derechos indígenas son progresistas, su aplicación está muy rezagada. Con el apoyo de Tenure Facility, la COONAPIP logró incrementar la atención del gobierno sobre los derechos territoriales indígenas, sustentándose también en la sentencia de la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos y el pronunciamiento de la Corte Suprema de Panamá.

La COONAPIP avanzó la titulación de 223.500 hectáreas en cuatro territorios y resolvió 18 conflictos de tenencia que afectaban a las comunidades

““La COONAPIP se formó hace años para fortalecer las luchas indígenas, en particular la de los territorios: es clave que a nuestros hermanos se les respete la tierra. Es nuestro sueño. Se han logrado comarcas, se ha conseguido la Ley 72, pero no ha habido seguimiento. A través del proyecto con el "Tenure Facility" logramos una imagen solida y ser escuchados. Por falta de recursos, era posible antes caer en el cansancio, o terminar dando vueltas y vueltas alrededor de nuestros justos reclamos. Pero el proyecto abrió un camino, un corte de camino: se logró sentar a dialogar al gobierno. Ahí están además, la labor tan importante de acompañamiento de la Clínica Jurídica; y el fortalecimiento técnico de nuestra juventud, donde hemos aportado junto con otras organizaciones. Mediciones y mapeo de tierras, que antes solo las podía hacía el sector gubernamental, cuando había disponibilidad, ahora las pueden hacer también y muy bien, jóvenes nuestros capacitados.” — Marcelo Guerra, Presidente de COONAPIP

Meta

Consolidar y proteger los derechos colectivos (tierra, bosques y agua) de los pueblos indígenas de Panamá

Objetivos

  • Aprovechar oportunidades abiertas dentro del Gobierno de Panamá para acelerar procesos de titulación de tierras, registro y resolución de conflictos, así como para fortalecer la gobernabilidad de los territorios indígenas
  • Desarrollar la capacidad institucional indígena para el pleno ejercicio y la protección de los derechos territoriales
“El gobierno se sorprendió porque, los siete grupos indígenas, vamos juntos ante las autoridades, para exigir que se aceleren los expedientes en ANATI y MI AMBIENTE.” — Manuel Martínez V., Coordinador del proyecto

Acciones

  • Fortalecer la capacidad de COONAPIP de proveer servicios legales para el pleno disfrute, ejercicio y protección de los derechos a la tierra, el agua y los bosques
  • Capacitar a las autoridades tradicionales en temas legales prioritarios, facilitando el acceso permanente y continuo al asesoramiento y servicios jurídicos para la promoción de los derechos indígenas así como la gobernabilidad de los territorios
  • Apoyar la titulación y registro de los Territorios Colectivos de Bajo Lepe y Pijibasal
  • Avanzar los procesos legales y administrativos necesarios para la titulación del Territorio Majé Emberá Drúa
  • Avanzar los procesos de titulación y gobernanza territorial en otras comunidades
“COONAPIP es la única entidad que reúne a los Pueblos Indígenas a nivel nacional. Sus siete culturas diferentes se enriquecen con la convivencia. COONAPIP es nuestro "hogar" donde construimos colectivamente. La perseverancia es importante. Algunos han estado esperando más de 20 años para ganar su territorio. No vemos los territorios como un negocio, sino como una necesidad para la reproducción de nuestra cultura .” — Ariel Gonzalez, adjudicador del proyecto

Resultados

  • Se avanzó en la titulación de 223.500 hectáreas, incluyendo cuatro territorios, y se resolvió 18 conflictos de tenencia que afectaban a las comunidades
  • Se impulsó la titulación y registro de los territorios colectivos de Bajo Lepe y Pijibasal. Sin embargo los títulos aun no han sido otorgados porque el Ministerio de Ambiente no ha dado su visto bueno, argumentado que existen impedimentos legales por traslape entre áreas protegidas y territorios indígenas
  • Se avanzaron los procesos legales y administrativos para la titulación del territorio de Majé Emberá Drúa. Sin embargo, los títulos aun no han sido otorgados porque el Ministerio de Ambiente no ha dado su visto bueno, argumentado que existen impedimentos legales por traslape con la Reserva Hidrológica del lugar, establecida, vale anotar, después de la ocupación indígena
  • Se avanzaron los procesos de titulación en otros territorios, tales como Bri Bri, Tagarkunyala y Wounaan, así como la gobernanza territorial en las comarcas de Wargandi, Emberá-Wounaan y en el territorio Naso
  • Se creó una “Clínica Jurídica” – entidad legal que ofreció apoyo a la titulación de tierras
  • Se aclararon los pasos a seguir para la titulación de tierras indígenas
  • Capacitados 252 mujeres, hombres y jóvenes en derecho indígena
  • Se avanzaron las gestiones para establecer un Diplomado en temas indígenas, dentro de la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Panamá
“ Hemos estado luchando por la titulación de nuestro territorio durante más de 40 años. En el último año, con el apoyo del proyecto PDCT de COONAPIP, hemos avanzado más que en los 40 años anteriores. ” — Lázaro Mecha, Cacique Regional de Majé Emberá Drúa

Incidencia

  • Se fortalecieron las habilidades administrativas y capacidades técnicas del equipo de COONAPIP, para impulsar la titulación de tierras indígenas
  • Se logró sensibilizar a las autoridades gubernamentales en su rol y responsabilidad de reconocer los derechos indígenas
  • Pueblos indígenas posicionados para proteger la tierra, los bosques, el agua, y mejorar sus medios de vida, contribuyendo así a los objetivos de desarrollo y a enfrentar el cambio climático global
  • Al tener mayor información sobre derechos y obligaciones, los pueblos indígenas potencian formas propias que pueden utilizarse para resolver conflictos entre comunidades, con el gobierno, con inversionistas o con colonos
“El gobierno se sorprendió porque [los siete grupos indígenas] vamos juntos ante las autoridades, para exigir que se aceleren los expedientes en ANATI y MI AMBIENTE. ” — Manuel Martínez V., Coordinador del proyecto

Lecciones aprendidas

  • Sigue siendo un desafío una mayor inclusión y equidad de mujeres y niñas en los procesos de titulación.
  • Es necesaria una hoja de ruta detallada para la titulación, de tal forma que los actores involucrados comprendan las funciones y responsabilidades de cada actor en cada paso.
  • Estrechas relaciones de trabajo entre autoridades gubernamentales y la COONAPIP, son esenciales. Así lo demuestra el éxito de los equipos de trabajo conjunto en la elaboración y verificación de las solicitudes de titulación.
  • La presencia de un Punto Focal de Tenure Facility, activo y constante durante todo el proyecto, hubiera sido un elemento valioso.
  • Las ventanas de oportunidades para la titulación de territorios indígenas pueden durar muy poco, permaneciendo abiertas sólo durante unos meses para luego cerrarse bruscamente debido a consideraciones políticas del gobierno, sin mediar cambios específicos en las leyes pertinentes o en el contexto político y económico mayor.
  • Que se establezca un marco legal hacia futuro, particularmente en países como Panamá, no es suficiente. El marco actual puede ser complejo y las contradicciones o inconsistencias dentro de las normas que regulan los procesos de titulación, pueden ser difíciles de entender y llegar a convertirse en verdaderos “cuellos de botella”.
  • El método de monitoreo, evaluación y aprendizaje de los proyectos debe adaptarse a la entidad particular, puesto que las organizaciones son diferentes. Esto sugiere que en el proceso de creación de un sistema de monitoreo, evaluación y aprendizaje por parte del Tenure Facility, el enfoque “de abajo hacia arriba” debe ser considerado, prestando más atención al desarrollo de la experiencia local y observando cómo ésta puede alimentar un sistema que se aplique al conjunto de actividades del Tenure Facility.

Terminado


Desde 06/30/2015
A 30 April 2017

Presupuesto
US$824,000

Proponentes

La Coordinadora Nacional de Pueblos Indígenas de Panamá, con la administración del Programa para la Promoción Social y Desarrollo (PRODESO), ONG panameña con personería jurídica registrada

Co-participantes

Congresos y Consejos de los territorios indígenas

Asociados

Autoridad Nacional de Administración de Tierras (ANATI)

Ministerio de Ambiente (MI AMBIENTE)

Comisión Nacional de Límites Políticos y Administrativos

National Geographic Institute “Tommy Guardia”

Rainforest Foundation-US

Beneficiarios

Pueblos Indígenas, comunidades y autoridades tradicionales participantes

COONAPIP

Autoridad Nacional de Administración de Tierras (ANATI)

Ministerio de Ambiente (MI AMBIENTE)

Comisión Nacional de Límites Políticos y Administrativos

Instituto Geográfico Nacional “Tommy Guardia”

Organizaciones académicas y de la sociedad civil